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Which Push-Up Variation Is Best for You?

What are the effective and the best types of pushups? Not all push-ups are created equal!  Feeling lost between wide and close grip variations? Remember, proper form is crucial to prevent injuries and maximize results.

If you have any concerns, consulting with a physical therapist can provide personalized guidance and ensure you’re exercising safely and effectively. Discover below the perfect variation to strengthen your upper body, build core stability, and achieve your fitness goals — and we are here for all your questions. 

Push-ups are a go-to exercise both inside and outside of the gym to build upper-body strength without any equipment and using only your body weight. Therefore, by considering the need of good chest health, we have unveiled the best push-up variations for the chest in this roundup.

As we know push-up exercise is a close-chain kinetic exercise that helps patients improve their joint proprioception, joint stability, and muscle co-activation around the shoulder joint. Kinetic exercises play a key role in physiotherapy or physical therapy.

This upper-body exercise trains both your strength and endurance. But as a compound exercise — or multi-joint exercise — the push-up is invaluable in a fitness routine, according to the American Council on Exercise (ACE).

We are revealing easy chest push-up variations that can help to improve your chest shape. let’s learn now, by simply tweaking your hand position, such as in a wide push-up or a close grip or narrow push-up, you can easily change which muscles you target.

You may have tried different push-up variations for chest improvement. These are easy pushup variations to strengthen your shoulders and chest. Here are the key differences between these two set-ups, plus how they help you develop strength and endurance.

How to Do a Wide Push-Up

Wide push-up technique is similar to that of a regular push-up, according to the ACE:

  1. Begin in a high plank with your glutes and core engaged. Place your hands wider than shoulder-distance apart and keep your hips in line with your head and heels.
  2. Keeping your back in a neutral position, slowly lower down until your elbows are bent at 90 degrees (or as low as you can go with good form).
  3. Push away from the floor to return to the starting position.

How to Do a Narrow Push-Up

A narrow or close-grip push-up looks like a regular push-up too, except that your hands are placed closer together, according to the ACE.

  1. Begin in a high plank with your glutes and core engaged. Place your hands directly under your shoulders and keep your hips in line with your head and heels.
  2. Keeping your back in a neutral position and your elbows tucked close to your ribs, slowly lower down until your chest nearly touches the floor (or as low as you can go with good form).
  3. Push away from the floor to return to the starting position.

Benefits of Wide vs. Narrow Push-Ups

push up variations for chest

You’ll get many push-up benefits no matter which type you choose, such as burning calories and building strength, stamina and muscle growth, according to the National Academy of Sports Medicine. But there are some unique perks depending on which variation you pick.

Wide Push-Ups

The wide push-up recruits more of your chest muscles, while a regular push-up shares the load with your triceps muscles.

Just make sure to maintain the placement of your hands and positioning of your shoulders the entire time: Tell yourself “wide shoulders” throughout the movement as a cue.

Close or Narrow Push-Ups

The close-grip push-up will target your triceps more than regular or wide push-ups, while still working your chest and core. This emphasis on a smaller muscle group (the triceps) makes close push-ups a more challenging movement.

You can make narrow push-ups a little easier by placing your hands on an elevated surface like a counter, wall or step for an incline push-up. These pushup variations are said to be best for the shoulders to strengthen but not only the chest.

Unleash your push-up potential with expert guidance. Physical therapy treatment can improve your mobility, reduce pain, and enhance your overall quality of life. Schedule your appointment today at (704) 803-8038. For more inspiration and tips, you can follow us on Instagram.


Reference: [https://www.livestrong.com/article/321226-wide-push-ups-vs-close-push-ups/]

11 Potential Causes of Knee Pain

Knee pain can be a frustrating roadblock to your active lifestyle. Let’s shed light on the most common culprits behind your discomfort. From injuries to overuse, we explore a range of possibilities to empower you with knowledge and help ease your pain. Knees are complicated creatures though! If you’re having mobility issues, discomfort — or outright pain, do come and see us and we will work through a personalized solution for you. You don’t have to live with it! 

11 Potential Knee Pain Causes and Treatment

Let’s get you back on your feet! Physical therapy can improve your mobility, reduce your knee pain, and enhance your overall quality of life. Schedule your appointment today at (704) 803-8038. For more inspiration and tips, you can follow us on Instagram.


Reference: [ https://www.health.com/fitness/knee-pain-exercise ]

Best Shoes For Walking and Running

Having the right shoes is essential. But with so many options on the market, it can be tough to know where to begin. Here’s how to choose the proper footwear for your activity to avoid injuries and pain. If you have more questions and want to learn more about your gait, or a shoe that caters to a specific injury you might be working through — let’s talk about it!

Walking and running are the most accessible types of exercise; the only equipment you really need is a good pair of shoes. But not just any footwear will do.

Right Shoes for Walking and Running

“While walking and running share similar movements, how your foot is supported differs, which is why most walking and running shoes are designed differently,” says Dr. Adam Tenforde, director of the Running Medicine Program at Harvard-affiliated Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital.

Taking Steps

Walking involves less stress on the feet than running, absorbing about 1.5 times a person’s body weight with each step compared with three times for running. When walking, your heels hit the ground first before your foot rolls forward to begin the next step. Because of this rolling motion, walking shoes are designed to have soft, flexible soles, which help you push off with each step. Also, because the heel strikes the ground first when you walk, walking shoes have an angled heel to absorb most of the shock and reduce pressure on the ankles.

In comparison, runner’s feet strike anywhere from the heel to the midfoot or forefoot. Therefore, running shoes are designed to have thicker soles that act as shock absorbers. They are also lighter than walking shoes to help with fatigue over longer distances. “Because of these differences, ideally running shoes can be used for walking, but you should not run in walking shoes,” says Dr. Tenforde.

Proper Protection

The right shoe for your activity can help you avoid foot and ankle pain. For example, plantar fasciitis, also known as heel pain, is caused by inflammation of the fibrous band of tissue on the bottom of the foot. Achilles tendinitis—inflammation of the tendon connecting the calf muscle to the heel—causes pain above the heel or along the back of the leg.

Proper footwear can also keep you away from knee pain treatment. “Footwear can contribute to changes in your mechanics and some shoes may cause pain suggesting these shoes place extra stress on your knees,” says Dr. Tenforde.

Remember that while the right shoes can protect against pain and injury, they can’t fix existing problems. “If you have any type of foot pain or impairment that makes walking or running uncomfortable, consult a physician or physical therapist to properly address the issue,” says Dr. Tenforde. “Changing shoes won’t help.”

Get Fitted

Because feet come in so many shapes and sizes, it’s impossible to recommend a specific walking or running shoe that suits everyone. (Some people, though, may benefit from minimalist shoes; see “The big impact of minimalist shoes” below.) Still, you should follow some basic guidelines for shoe shopping and wearing. For example:

  • Visit a specialty running store, as it will offer a variety of styles and have hands-on fitting experts.
  • Have your arch and gait evaluated to find out whether your foot rolls inward (pronation), rolls outward (supination), or stays neutral. Many running stores provide this service.
  • Feet tend to expand during the day, so shop in the early evening when your feet are at their largest.
  • Bring your own socks. The thickness of your socks will affect how your shoes fit, so wear ones you like when trying on shoes. (When walking or running always wear synthetic or cotton-synthetic blends to wick away moisture.)
  • Your athletic shoes will usually need to be a half-size larger than your regular shoes to accommodate any swelling during activity.
  • Bring along any orthotics or other shoe inserts you usually use. Many shoe brands do not accommodate them, so you may need to go up an additional half-size.
  • Feet naturally widen with age, so make sure your shoes have adequate width: Remove the shoe’s insole and step on it. If your foot goes over the edges, the shoe is too narrow.
  • There should be some wiggle room in the toe box. You should have about a half-inch (or one finger’s width) between your longest toe and the front of the shoe.
  • Test a shoe’s flexibility. Grab the toe and heel of a shoe and pull them toward each other. The shoe should bend easily at the ball of the foot. Flexibility offers a greater range of motion and an easier push-off.
  • Shoes should feel right when you step into them and not need to be “broken in.”
  • Experts recommend replacing shoes every 300 to 500 miles. Walking or running for 30 minutes daily, five days a week, translates to a new pair every six to 12 months.

The Big Impact of Minimalist Shoes

One popular type of walking and running shoe is called the minimalist shoe, which more closely mimics how people naturally walk or run barefoot. They’re characterized by minimal cushioning in the midsoles and heel. “Less cushioning and a lower heel-to-toe drop may encourage you to land more on your midfoot or forefoot rather than your heel,” says Dr. Adam Tenforde, director of the Running Medicine Program at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital.

A study published Sept. 20, 2021, in Scientific Reports found that people who wore this type of shoe daily for six months improved the strength of their foot muscles. Minimalist shoes also may help reduce the risk for knee and foot pain and improve balance. They are not suitable for everyone like people with peripheral artery disease or diabetic neuropathy.

Dr. Tenforde suggests easing into the shoes. “Wear them around the house for short periods and see how your feet feel. Then increase the duration and do your usual walk or run in them, and re-evaluate.”

Invest in your health and well-being! Physical therapy can improve your mobility, reduce pain, and enhance your overall quality of life. Schedule your appointment today at (704) 803-8038. For more inspiration and tips, you can follow us on Instagram. We look forward to supporting you on your health journey!


Reference: [ https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/the-right-shoe-for-walking-and-running ]

Understanding and Conquering Tennis Elbow

Tennis elbow is the common term used to refer to elbow pain caused by overuse of the forearm and arm muscles. Of course, you don’t have to be an avid tennis player to get this condition. For people who deal with chronic elbow pain, physical therapy can ease the pain. Learn more about this condition below. If you have any questions, we would be pleased to get them answered!

What Are the Tennis Elbow Therapies / Treatments?

Tennis elbow, also known as lateral epicondylitis, is a condition that can result from overuse of the muscles and tendons in the elbow. Tennis elbow is often linked to repeated motions of the wrist and arm.

Despite its name, most people who get tennis elbow don’t play tennis. Some people have jobs that involve repeated movements that can lead to tennis elbow. These include plumbers, painters, carpenters and butchers. However, often tennis elbow has no clear cause.

The pain of tennis elbow occurs mainly where the tough, cord-like tissues of the forearm muscles attach to a bony bump on the outside of the elbow. The tissues are known as tendons. Pain can spread into the forearm and wrist.

Rest, pain medicines and physical therapy often help relieve tennis elbow. People for whom these treatments don’t help or who have symptoms that get in the way of daily living might have a procedure, such as a shot or surgery.

Tennis Elbow Symptoms

The pain of tennis elbow can travel from the outside of the elbow into the forearm and wrist. Pain and weakness can make it hard to:

  • Shake hands or grip an object.
  • Turn a doorknob.
  • Hold a coffee cup.

When to See a Doctor

Talk to a health care provider if self-care steps such as rest, ice and pain relievers don’t ease your elbow pain and tenderness.

Tennis Elbow Pain Causes

Tennis elbow is often linked to overuse and muscle strain. But the cause is not well understood. Sometimes, repeated tensing of the forearm muscles that are used to straighten and raise the hand and wrist triggers the symptoms. This can cause a breakdown of the fibers in the tendon that attaches the forearm muscles to the bony bump at the outside of the elbow.

Activities that can cause tennis elbow symptoms include:

  • Playing racket sports, especially using backhand, with poor form.
  • Using plumbing tools.
  • Painting.
  • Driving screws.
  • Cutting up foods for cooking, particularly meat.
  • Using a computer mouse a lot.

Less often, an injury or a condition that affects the body’s connective tissues causes tennis elbow. Often, the cause isn’t known.

Risk Factors

Factors that can increase the risk of tennis elbow include:

  • Age. Tennis elbow affects people of all ages. But it’s most common in adults between the ages of 30 and 60.
  • Work. People who have jobs that involve repeating motions of the wrist and arm are more likely to develop tennis elbow. These include plumbers, painters, carpenters, butchers and cooks.
  • Certain sports. Playing racket sports increases the risk of tennis elbow. Not having good form or using poor equipment increases the risk even more. Playing more than two hours a day also increases the risk.

Other factors that can increase the risk include smoking, being obese and certain medicines.

Stop letting pain sideline you! A physical therapist at Uncommon PT can help you conquer your tennis elbow — or any other pains or mobility issues that are holding you back — and get back to enjoying the activities you love. Schedule your appointment today at (704) 803-8038. For more inspiration and tips, you can follow Instagram.


Reference: [ https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/tennis-elbow/symptoms-causes/syc-20351987 ]

Smart Strategies for Staying Active with Joint Pain

Tired of letting joint pain hold you back? You’re not alone! Millions of people face the daily challenge of managing discomfort while staying active. Here is your passport to a world where you can embrace movement, defy limitations, and rediscover the joy of an active life. If you have questions — or want to explore a personalized program — we are here!

Physiotherapy Exercises for Joint Pain 

When you’re active or upping your exercise goals, the last thing you want is to be sidelined with joint pain. Joint pain affects people at all stages of life from student athletes to seniors. Pain can be a big barrier to not only maintaining a regular exercise program, but also getting started. These strategies can help keep you active.

Assess Where You’re At

A good first step if you want to start a regular routine or up your exercise goals is to check with your primary care provider or see a sports medicine specialist who can assess your overall fitness level, general mobility and if you have current injuries or pain.

They also may conduct a functional movement screening to evaluate how you move and pinpoint specific issues. For example, you may have decreased range of motion in a hip or shoulder, or are stronger on one side than the other. This screening can identify specific rehabilitative exercises that can be done along with your regular exercise program.

These exercises help your body move safely, perform exercises correctly, and reduce the risk for injury or make symptoms worse. These findings will help build a program that’s going to be safe and effective for you and let you exercise as pain-free as possible.

Joint Relief Exercise Routine

Whatever your level of fitness, a good exercise routine should be sustainable. Regular exercise provides a host of health-related benefits, including reducing risk of cardiovascular disease, managing weight, maintaining strength and flexibility, and supporting bone health.

It Also Should Encompass a Combination of Activities:

  • Cardio, which increases heart rate and improves your overall cardiovascular fitness. This includes vigorous walking, swimming, biking, playing pickleball, or taking a dance or water fitness class.
  • Strength, which builds and strengthen muscles, improves overall function and improves performance in the gym, as well as activities of daily living. Strength activities include weight training, working with resistance bands, climbing stairs and exercises such as pushups, situps and squats.
  • Flexibility, which stretches muscles and ligaments and promotes range of motion. Stretching, yoga, tai chi and Pilates all focus on flexibility.

And finally, regular exercise doesn’t mean just going to the gym, taking a class or following an online exercise program. It also means moving throughout the day, especially to break up periods of sitting. This unstructured exercise may be sweeping the floor, walking in place by your desk or doing some simple stretches when you first get up or before you go to bed.

Customize Exercise to You;

Sore muscles after exercising, especially if people are new to exercise and working on increasing their activity level, are normal. But sharp or ongoing pain may indicate an injury or chronic problem.

Some Points to Keep in Mind Are:

  • Ease your way into a new exercise program. Try not to go from 0 to 100 overnight, since that may increase your risk of injury.
  • Listen to your body. Don’t overdo it. Take a break or tone down your activity for the rest of the day.
  • Keep a small problem small. If you’re feeling recurring pain, get it checked out.
  • Build in time to recover between activity sessions. Our bodies need this time to rebuild and repair.

Another strategy is to work with a physical therapist, sports medicine specialist or trainer to determine the right and wrong way to do an exercise, or strengthen muscles to support a particular movement or joint. For example:

  • If you suffer from low-back pain and are not able to perform a traditional barbell back squat exercise, you could do a modified version: either a split squat (one leg at a time) or rear-foot-elevated squat. These variations target the same muscle groups, but apply external resistance in the form of dumbbells or kettlebells at your side instead of on your back.
  • If you have knee pain, using a reverse lunge or hex-bar squat helps reduces stress on your knees and allows you to target the same muscle groups.
  • If you aren’t able to perform pushups or variations of the bench press without pain in your upper body, switching to a neutral grip position can reduce stress on the shoulder. Make sure to align the arms in a 45-degree angle with your torso to reduce stress on the shoulder and minimize pain.

Working with an exercise specialist can help you develop a plan that is specific to you and your abilities.

When joint pain begins to restrict the activities you love, it’s time to consult with an orthopedic specialist. Together, you’ll map out a plan for treatment to keep you moving and enjoying life. Orthopedic providers have a wide variety of options in their treatment toolbox. These options range from least invasive, such as physical therapy or medications, to more invasive, including injections or surgery. Their goal is to get patients back to the lives they want to lead.

 Joint Pain Treatment and Break Down Barriers 


Joint Pain is Just One Barrier to Regular Exercise. Others Include:

  • Time
    To start and maintain regular exercise, people need to carve time out of their schedules. Recent research shows that even short 5- to 15-minute workouts throughout the day can provide health and fitness benefits. Finding these little pockets of time and a consistent workout can go a long way.
  • Knowing Where to Start
    Doing an online search for workout programs can yield overwhelming results. Once again, sports medicine specialists can provide guidance toward a program that best fits your goals. The choice of workouts should be ones you enjoy and can stick with.
  • Motivation
    Whether it’s getting started or keeping going, lack of motivation can sink workout resolutions. One successful strategy is to review goals as a reminder of why you want to exercise, whether it’s to keep up with the grandkids, feel better or lose weight.
  • Being Realistic
    Build a foundation by setting goals that can be accomplished in small segments, with each building on the next. For example, if you’re just starting, a walk around the block might be a first step, not signing up for a 5K.

The benefits of regular exercise are both physical and mental. Make sure you play the long game when it comes to your exercise program. Find a style of exercise that works for you long-term and that you can incorporate into your daily life.

Unlock the secrets to a pain-free, active life! Our expert team of physical therapists is here to help! Whether it’s targeted exercises, manual therapy, or personalized treatment plans, we’ve got the tools to get you moving with ease. Schedule your appointment today at (704) 803-8038. For more inspiration and tips, you can follow us on Instagram.


Reference: [https://www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/speaking-of-health/staying-active-with-joint-pain]

Physical Therapy for Lumbar Disc Herniation

Lumbar disc herniations are a common source of low back and leg pain in adults. As we age, we tend to accept low back pain as a part of getting old — and that we should expect it. The truth is no one should live with pain!

Physical Therapy for Lumbar Disc Herniation

Enduring pain is abnormal and unnecessary, and there is evidence to support that lower back pain therapist can address low back pain from a herniated, slipped, or ruptured disc. Here is how the professionals at Uncommon Physical Therapy can help.

Disc Herniation as a Source of Back Pain

The spine comprises vertebrae stacked one on top of the other, starting at the base of the head and extending down to what most people know as the “tailbone.” The spine has different sections based on where they are in the body. The lumbar spine is the section that makes up the lower back area, just above the hips. Between each vertebra is a disc of cartilage. This cartilage can become overloaded such that the outer cartilage tears and a piece of the inner cartilage “slip out;” this now protruding piece of the disc can create compression on the nerves that exit the spine from the spinal cord.

Symptoms of a Herniated Disc

The compression of the herniated disc on the nervous structures that exit the spine can lead to a variety of symptoms:

  • Low back pain
  • Pain in the buttocks or down the legs
  • Pain with sitting with relief upon standing
  • Numbness or tingling in the legs or feet
  • Weakness in legs

Physical Therapy for a Herniated Disc

Low back pain is so prevalent globally that a plethora of evidence-based research supports physical therapy for conservative management of back pain associated with lumbar disc herniation. Here at Uncommon Physical Therapy, we use the most up-to-date research to help guide our treatment plans, emphasizing manual physical therapy.

We offer a variety of hands-on therapies such as dry needling, therapeutic ultrasound, cupping, soft tissue manipulation, and joint mobilization. We use these treatments in combination with a personalized exercise plan to help target your deficits and address the impairments that commonly accompany disc herniation.

When patients come into Uncommon Physical Therapy, we take the time to listen to everyone. We want to hear about your history, measure your strength and flexibility, see how well you can move, and know your goals.

During your first visit to Uncommon PT, we conduct a thorough examination — we discuss your symptoms, look at your strength and range of motion, and identify what provokes your pain. Then we can focus on your most significant deficits while considering your goals for physical therapy, so we can help get you back to the lifestyle you deserve. Pain should not have to become your new reality.

With our team here at Uncommon Physical Therapy, we can help you address your pain so that you can get back to living.
Call (704) 803-8038 or join us on Facebook We look forward to helping you!

Physical Therapy Management for Patients Post-Concussion

The incidence of concussions and concussion-type symptoms in the United States and globally continues to grow alarmingly. About half of Americans have or will sustain at least one such injury in their lifetime. Evidence-based care shows that physical therapy can help you return to your sport, school, work, or recent activity more quickly.

When You Need Concussion Physical Therapy?

Physical therapy can be initiated and is encouraged to begin between 48 hours and three weeks after getting a concussion. If you feel you are experiencing the signs of being concussed, Uncommon Physical Therapy can offer you the latest, most effective treatments.

Hip Labral Tear Facts

Your hip is a ball and socket joint with a labrum between the femur and the acetabulum. The labrum helps cushion and to distribute the load within the joint. A hip labral tear injury can occur over time or from trauma. Labral tears that occur over time are usually present in middle-aged and older adults. Trauma to the labral tear generally occurs in the younger population. This trauma usually occurs when the planting of the foot combines with an uncontrolled twisting motion at the hip joint, causing stress to the labrum, and causing a tear.

Symptoms of a Concussion:

The most common symptoms associated with concussion are:

  • Headaches
  • Cervical Spine (neck) pain
  • Dizziness
  • Visual deficits/problems
  • Problems with thinking or cognition
  • Mood/mental health complications
  • Problems with sleeping and fatigue

Uncommon Physical Therapy – Post-Concussion Management

Physical Therapists can expertly treat and manage every sign and symptom someone with a concussion may present. The therapist can and should provide education to reduce the frequency and intensity of headaches, which is the most common complaint post-concussion. Also, physical therapists can educate on how to manage difficulties concentrating and how to manage problems with sleeping and fatigue.

Physical therapists can provide a series of assessments and treatments for any patient with dizziness after a concussion, including treating vertigo and working to improve dizziness in general or of cervicogenic (neck) origin. Dry Needling, Mulligan Sustained Natural Apophyseal Glides (SNAGs), and Maitland Passive Joint Mobilizations are some techniques that can resolve any dizziness. Physical therapists can also help to treat any visual impairments present post-concussion.

Physical Therapy for a Hip Labral Tear

Physical therapy is an underutilized source for patients who have sustained a concussion — as therapists can offer a variety of education and treatment options to help manage and improve symptoms. If you or anyone you know has recently sustained a concussion or are still experiencing symptoms, trust in the empowering and friendly staff at Uncommon Physical Therapy to help get you better — faster.

When patients come into Uncommon Physical Therapy, we take the time to listen to everyone. We want to hear about your history, measure your strength and flexibility, see how well you can move, and know your goals.

Uncommon PT uses the latest evidence to support and drive our treatment approaches. Each therapist is equipped and trained in treating several conditions, including patients who have sustained a concussion. Let Uncommon Physical Therapy show you that you can be stronger longer by offering more than you think! Contact our team today to learn how physical therapy can help you recover from a concussion.
Call (704) 803-8038 or join us on Facebook You won’t regret it!

Hip Labral Tear Relief From Uncommon Physical Therapy

Are you experiencing pain with weight-bearing activities like walking, running, and everyday activities? Over time, underlying problems with the hip joint can cause a labral tear.

Overuse, traumatic injuries, abnormalities in the hip joints — whatever the reason, physical therapy for hip labral tears is vital to addressing the issue. Uncommon Physical Therapy can help.

Labral Tear Hip Joint Treatment / Hip Labral Tear Facts 

Your hip is a ball and socket joint with a labrum between the femur and the acetabulum. The labrum helps to cushion and distribute the load within the joint. A hip labral tear injury can occur over time or from trauma. Labral tears that occur over time are usually present in middle-aged and older adults.

Trauma to the labral tear generally occurs in the younger population. This trauma usually occurs when the planting of the foot combines with an uncontrolled twisting motion at the hip joint, causing stress to the labrum, and causing a tear.

Symptoms of a Hip Labral Tear

Patients at Uncommon Physical Therapy may experience all or some of the following symptoms:

  • Pain with weight-bearing
  • Click/popping
  • Dull ache with bouts of sharp pain
  • Hip giving way
  • Anterior hip/groin pain

Physical Therapy for a Hip Labral Tear

Individuals over 50 were all found to have some version of hip pathology. Some individuals with hip labral tears can still perform their desired activities without pain or limitation — but the injury will manifest itself in time. Physical therapy for hip labral tears is beneficial to return to everyday activities without pain.

Uncommon PT’s hip physical therapy carries the most up-to-date evidence-based research to treat patients. They utilize dry needling, ultrasound combined with electrical stimulation, cupping, massage, and stretching/strengthening exercises to target specific muscles and imbalances to get you back to your everyday life as quickly as possible.

When patients come into Uncommon Physical Therapy, we take the time to listen to everyone. We want to hear about your history, measure your strength and flexibility, see how well you can move, and know your goals.

There is no need to continue to avoid activities that you love. For all your physical therapy needs, Contact our team for all your physical therapy needs today — and experience the best treatment in the area!
Call (704) 803-8038 or join us on Fackbook

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Uncommon Physical Therapy has changed my life. I was suffering from horrible sciatica, hip and pelvic pain for 2 years. Now a couple of weeks later, I have been pain-free. I can sleep! Thank you so much!
Doug S.
Uncommon PT -- They truly listened to what was happening with my pain. They gave me exercise and attention no other PT has. I was giving up on PT. This was my last try. It was 100% worth it.
Beth M.
Great guy, Davis. Professional, intuitive, on the money. Time well spent. My shoulder is almost as good as new. Didn't think this progress was possible.
James G.